mediocr:

Do you ever just think about the future and start freaking out about the most random things

(via searchingforthelostpath)

severalbadpunslater:

this is probably one of my favorite jokes in all of western media

(via theycallmegomer)

leoaldez:

The 7 Heroes of Olympus → First Words to Say (x) insp

(Source: nightcrqwler, via the-beauty-from-pain)

bear-onica:

shitloadsofwrestling:

One day, that toddler will be telling everyone about the time she went one on one with the great one, pattycaking his candy ass.

the rock is a gift

bear-onica:

shitloadsofwrestling:

One day, that toddler will be telling everyone about the time she went one on one with the great one, pattycaking his candy ass.

the rock is a gift

(Source: best-of-imgur, via the-beauty-from-pain)

texasassy:

by cute do you mean you wanna frick frack or do you mean I look 12

(via skyelarks)

A little nonsense now and then, is cherished by the wisest men.

Roald Dahl (via kushandwizdom)

(via theycallmegomer)

thesleepydaydreamer:

Pedri likes making dragonflies for Wrathia. And that is adorable.

(via skyelarks)

third-personomniscient:

nothinbutmaggotybread:

when i see a cute boy

image

I’m on mobile and I was in no way ready for that image when it loaded

(via skyelarks)

pitchpipestarkid:

annalovesherchocolate:

I’ve never seen The Hunchback of Notre Dame but it looks great

you must see it now

(Source: disneygifs, via skyelarks)

(Source: weirdlayers, via demisnowflake)

phoenix-fires:

henrylisitski:

applebottomclaudiajeans:

capekalaska:

killdeercheer:

sizvideos:

Neil DeGrasse Tyson Ruins Your Zombie Fantasies Forever - Video

Love this bit

"just sayin’"

He’s thought about it though. One of the greatest minds of our generation sat down one day and was like “wait, could zombies exist?” And then he did the science thing and was like “nah we’re good.”

I still think it’s possible for a zombie to exist. Not as we think of zombies, but more so as a parasitic thing of sorts, where it just gains control of the body and does it’s zombie stuff.

Or some weird thing that turns you into a cannibal

(via uplifted-chaos)

(Source: dimensao7, via skyelarks)

Those who are free of resentful thoughts surely find peace.

Buddha (via kushandwizdom)

(via theycallmegomer)

art-of-swords:

Great Britain’s Sword of State

  • Maker: George Bowers, goldsmith, active 1660
  • Dated: 1678 - 1698
  • Medium: steel, silver gilt, the scabbard of wood, velvet, silver gilt.
  • Measurements: 121.3 x 32.1 cm
  • Acquirer: Charles II, King of Great Britain (1630-85), when King of Great Britain de facto (1660-85)
  • Provenance: supplied to Charles II in 1678, the scabbard supplied to William III

The sword has a broad, straight, flat, two-edged steel blade with etched decoration, and a cruciform silver-gilt hilt, the quillons in the form of a rampant lion and unicorn, a fleur-de-lis at the front of the quillon block and a Tudor rose at the back, with a portcullis above. The wooden scabbard is covered in velvet with applied silver-gilt emblems including a rose, thistle, harp and fleur-de-lis, with a portcullis, royal lions and the coat of arms of William III.

This sword, known as the Sword of State, was traditionally used by the monarch after the coronation, in place of the Sword of Offering (which was kept with the regalia in the Abbey), for all formal occasions, when it would have been carried before the sovereign. The hilt of the sword and the decorative emblems on the scabbard show that it was intended to be carried with the point upwards.

Two swords of state were made for Charles II - the first in 1660, and this one in 1678. It is described as 'a new Sword of Estate most extraordinarily wrought Enchased and gilt'. The 1660 sword was used when Charles II attended Parliament, and this example was used at other formal occasions such as the ceremonial creation of the Knights of the Bath.

The scabbard carries the coat of arms of William III and so dates from his coronation. The 1660 sword no longer exists but this one has remained among the regalia in the Tower of London. It is still used occasionally by the Queen for events such as the investiture of the Prince of Wales in 1969 and the VE Day service in St Paul’s Cathedral in 1995.

Source: Copyright © 2014 The Royal Collection Trust/Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II